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LRB-2628/2
EM/KRP/JK/MD/MS:all
2017 - 2018 LEGISLATURE
August 24, 2017 - Introduced by Representatives Jarchow, Allen, R. Brooks,
Felzkowski, Gannon, Horlacher, Hutton, Kremer, Krug, Quinn, Stafsholt
and Tusler, cosponsored by Senators Tiffany, Darling, Lasee and Nass.
Referred to Committee on Housing and Real Estate.
AB480,2,13 1An Act to repeal 227.115 (5); to renumber and amend 66.1105 (2) (ab) and
2227.115 (2); to amend 13.099 (2), 13.099 (3) (title), 13.099 (3) (a) (intro.), 13.099
3(3) (a) 2., 13.099 (3) (a) 3., 13.099 (3) (b), 16.848 (2) (f), 20.002 (2) (a), 20.835 (3)
4(title), 25.29 (1) (a), 25.29 (7) (intro.), 25.29 (7) (a), 25.29 (7) (b), 30.12 (3) (a) 3g.,
530.12 (3) (a) 3r., 41.41 (10) (b), 41.41 (10) (c) 1., 66.0617 (7), 66.10015 (2) (b),
666.1105 (2) (f) 3. (intro.), 66.1105 (4) (c), 66.1105 (4) (gm) 4. a., 66.1105 (4) (gm)
74. bm., 66.1105 (4) (gm) 6., 66.1105 (4m) (b) 2., 66.1105 (6) (a) 8., 66.1105 (6) (g)
83., 70.57 (4) (b) 1., 70.57 (4) (b) 2., 70.58 (1), 70.58 (2), 227.115 (2) (title), 227.115
9(3) (title), 227.115 (3) (a) (intro.), 227.115 (3) (a) 2., 227.115 (3) (a) 3., 227.115 (3)
10(b), 227.15 (1) and 706.05 (2m) (b) 1.; to repeal and recreate 227.115 (1) and
11227.19 (3) (g); and to create 13.099 (3) (a) 6., 13.099 (3) (c), 13.099 (3) (d), 20.835
12(3) (ef), 66.1105 (2) (n) 1., 66.1105 (2) (n) 2., 66.1105 (2) (o), 66.1105 (4) (gm) 4.
13am., 66.1105 (6) (a) 14., 66.1105 (7) (ak) 5., 70.58 (3), 101.63 (5m), 227.115 (2)
14(b), 227.115 (3) (a) 6., 227.115 (3) (c), 227.115 (3) (d), 348.16 (3) (d) and 349.16

1(3) (d) of the statutes; relating to: review by the Department of Safety and
2Professional Services of the state electrical wiring code applicable to
3one-family and two-family dwellings; the legal description required for
4recording an easement for the construction, operation, or maintenance of sewer
5lines or facilities; expanding the use of tax incremental financing for workforce
6housing development and allowing a reduction in the amount of certain impact
7fees; effect of changes in requirements for development-related permits or
8authorizations on persons who apply for the permits or authorizations;
9exempting certain vehicles delivering propane from class B highway weight
10limitations and certain special or seasonal weight limitations; elimination of
11the forestation state property tax; reviews of and reports on bills and proposed
12administrative rules that affect housing; general permits to place riprap on the
13bed of a navigable water; and making an appropriation.
Analysis by the Legislative Reference Bureau
introduction
This bill makes various changes relating to the following:
1. Review by the Department of Safety and Professional Services of the state
electrical wiring code applicable to one-family and two-family dwellings.
2. The legal description required for recording an easement for the
construction, operation, or maintenance of sewer lines or facilities.
3. Expanding the use of tax incremental financing for workforce housing
development and requiring a reduction in the amount of certain impact fees.
4. The effect of changes in requirements for development-related permits or
authorizations on persons who apply for the permits or authorizations.
5. Exempting certain vehicles delivering propane from class B highway weight
limitations and certain special or seasonal weight limitations.
6. Eliminating the forestation state property tax.
7. Reviews of and reports on bills and proposed administrative rules that affect
housing.
8. General permits to place riprap on the bed of a navigable water.

review of state electrical wiring code
This bill requires the Department of Safety and Professional Services to review,
once every six years, those portions of the state electrical wiring code that apply to
one-family and two-family dwellings. In reviewing the code, DSPS must consult
with the Uniform Dwelling Code Council and any council or committee created by
the secretary of DSPS to advise DSPS regarding the code.
formal requisites for recording sewer easements
This bill provides that a document that is recorded in the real estate records
does not need to contain a full legal description of an easement for the construction,
operation, or maintenance of sewer lines or facilities. Under current law, with
certain exceptions, a document that affects title to land in this state that is recorded
in the real estate records must contain a full legal description of the property affected
by the document. One exception provides that a full legal description is not required
for a description of an easement for the construction, operation, or maintenance of
electric, gas, railroad, water, telecommunications, or telephone lines or facilities.
The bill adds sewers to the types of easements that are not required to have a full
legal description.
tax incremental financing, impact fees
This bill authorizes the creation of workforce housing development tax
incremental districts and changes the method of imposing certain impact fees.
Under the current tax incremental financing program, a city or village may
create a TID in part of its territory to foster development under certain conditions.
Currently, towns and counties also have a limited ability to create a TID under
certain limited circumstances. Before a city or village may create a TID, several
steps and plans are required. These steps and plans include public hearings on the
proposed TID within specified time frames, preparation and adoption by the local
planning commission of a proposed project plan for the TID, approval of the proposed
project plan by the common council or village board, approval of the city's or village's
proposed TID by a joint review board (JRB) that consists of members who represent
the overlying taxation districts, and adoption of a resolution by the common council
or village board that creates the TID as of a date provided in the resolution.
Also under current law, once a TID has been created, the Department of
Revenue calculates the “tax incremental base" value of the TID, which is the
equalized value of all taxable property within the TID at the time of its creation. If
the development in the TID increases the value of the property in the TID above the
base value, a “value increment" is created. That portion of taxes collected on the
value increment in excess of the base value is called a “tax increment." The tax
increment is placed in a special fund that may be used only to pay back the project
costs of the TID.
The project costs of a TID, which are initially incurred by the creating city or
village, include public works such as sewers, streets, and lighting systems; financing
costs; site preparation costs; and professional service costs. DOR authorizes the
allocation of the tax increments until the TID terminates or, generally, 20 years, 23
years, or 27 years after the TID is created, depending on the type of TID and the year
in which it was created. Also under current law, a city or village may not generally

make expenditures for project costs later than five years before the unextended
termination date of the TID. Under certain circumstances, the life of the TID, the
expenditure period, and the allocation period may be extended. A TID is required
to terminate, under current law and with some exceptions, once its project costs are
paid back.
Generally under current law, project costs may be expended to benefit
residential development but only certain TIDs for which a project plan was approved
before September 30, 1995, or for a mix-use development. With regard to a
mixed-use development, lands proposed for newly platted residential use may not
exceed 35 percent, by area, of real property within the TID.
Under the bill, a workforce housing TID may contain only newly platted
residential uses, 100 percent of which must be workforce housing. Before such a TID
may be created, the JRB must approve the TID by a unanimous vote. For other TIDs,
only a majority vote is required. A workforce housing TID has a maximum life of 15
years, and DOR may allocate tax increments for only 15 years.
Also under the bill, workforce housing is defined to mean housing based on the
following two factors, which are subject to the five year average median costs as
determined by the U.S. bureau of census:
1. Housing that costs no more than 30 percent of the household's gross median
income.
2. The construction cost per housing unit, including rental housing, is no more
than 80 percent of the median price for new residential construction in the county.
Under current law, if a city, village, or town imposes an impact fee on a
developer to pay for certain capital costs that are necessary to accommodate land
development, the ordinance may provide for an exemption from, or a reduction in the
amount of, impact fees on land development that provides low-cost housing. Under
this bill, the impact fee exemption or reduction provisions also apply to workforce
housing. Current law prevents the shifting of an exemption from or reduction in
impact fees to any other development in the land development in which the low-cost
housing is located. The bill applies this provision to workforce housing as well.
development regulation
Under current law, if a project requires more than one approval or approvals
from more than one political subdivision and the applicant identifies the full scope
of the project at the time of filing the application for the first approval required for
the project, the existing requirements applicable in each political subdivision at the
time of filing are applicable to all subsequent approvals required for the project.
Under this bill, for any project that requires an approval, if the applicant
identifies the full scope of the project at the time of filing the application for the first
approval required for the project, the existing requirements applicable in each
political subdivision from which a subsequent approval is necessary at the time of
filing are applicable to all subsequent approvals required for the project.
propane transport
Under current law, in general, no person may operate on a highway any vehicle
or combination of vehicles that exceeds certain statutory weight limits unless that
person obtains a permit issued by the Department of Transportation or a local

highway authority. Among the weight limitations are, generally, limitations on the
gross weight imposed on the highway by the wheels of any one axle or by consecutive
axles of the vehicle. In general, the maximum weight that may be imposed on the
highway by one axle is 20,000 pounds and the maximum weight that may be imposed
on the highway by two axles is 35,000 pounds if the axles are eight feet apart and
34,000 pounds if the axles are less than eight feet apart.
Also under current law, local highway authorities may impose special or
seasonal weight limitations on highways that, because of deterioration or climatic
conditions, would likely be seriously damaged or destroyed if limitations were not
imposed. For vehicles carrying certain commodities or being used to perform certain
services, local highway authorities may set different weight limitations or exempt
the vehicles from the special or seasonal weight limitations if an exemption or
limitation is in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare.
Local authorities may also designate highways under their jurisdiction as class
“B” highways. With limited exceptions, the maximum gross weight and per-axle
vehicle weight for vehicles on a class “B” highway is 60 percent of the weight allowed
by statute if the vehicles were operating on a highway that is not designated as a
class “B” highway.
This bill provides that special or seasonal weight limitations imposed by a
highway authority and class “B” highway weight limitations do not apply to a motor
vehicle that is being operated to deliver propane for heating purposes if the gross
weight imposed on the highway by the vehicle does not exceed 30,000 pounds, for a
vehicle with a single rear axle, or 40,000 pounds, for a vehicle with tandem rear axles,
and, if the motor vehicle is a tank vehicle, the tank is loaded to no more than 50
percent of the capacity of the tank. The bill provides that a tank vehicle must be
equipped with a gauge on the tank that shows the amount of propane in the tank as
a percent of capacity of the tank and must carry documentation of the capacity of the
tank either on the cargo tank or in the cab of the vehicle.
forestation state property tax
This bill eliminates the forestation state property tax. Proceeds from the tax
are paid into the conservation fund and used to acquire, preserve, and develop the
forests of the state. The tax rate is 0.1697 mills for each dollar of the assessed value
of the property of the state as determined by the Department of Revenue. The bill
provides that in each fiscal year an amount equal to 0.1697 mills for each dollar of
the assessed value of the property of the state is transferred from the general fund
to the conservation fund to be used for the same purpose as the tax.
reports on bills and rules affecting housing
Current law requires the Department of Administration to prepare a report on
any bill or any proposed administrative rule that directly or substantially affects the
development, construction, cost, or availability of housing in this state. A report for
a bill must be completed within 30 days after the bill affecting housing is introduced,
and a report for a proposed rule must be completed within 30 days after the rule is
submitted to DOA and must be completed before the rule is submitted to the
Legislative Council Staff for review. A report on either a bill or a proposed rule that
affects housing must include information on the effect of the bill or proposed rule on

the state housing strategy plan, the cost of constructing, rehabilitating, improving,
or maintaining housing, the cost and availability of financing to purchase or develop
housing, the purchase price of housing, and other housing costs such as rent, utilities
and property taxes.
This bill does all of the following with respect to reports on bills or rules
affecting housing:
1. Retitles such a report a “housing impact analysis.”
2. Requires a housing impact analysis for any bill or proposed rule that may
increase or decrease, either directly or indirectly, the cost of the development,
construction, financing, purchasing, sale, ownership, or availability of housing in
this state.
3. Makes various changes to the information and analysis that is required to
be included in a housing impact analysis and specifies how that information is
expressed in the report.
4. With respect to a housing impact analysis for a proposed rule, requires the
agency proposing the rule, rather than DOA, to prepare the housing impact analysis.
The bill also requires that a housing impact analysis be included in an agency's
submission to the Legislative Council Staff during the rule-making process and that
an agency prepare a revised housing impact analysis if the housing impact of the rule
is significantly changed.
riprap general permits
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